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Author Topic: Ghosts and zombies  (Read 4200 times)
Altivo
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« on: October 02, 2010, 09:20:17 PM »

OK, here's a fitting topic for October. We're making a display for the library, and I need help finding more of the appropriate authors. I'm sure there are many more than the ones I've thought of so far.

"Ghost Writers in the Sky" will feature authors who have died but new works (not previously published) keep appearing under their names. (Some are previously unpublished manuscripts, others are "ghost written" from outlines or notes or just based on prior works of the author, yet they bear the original author's name first, usually along with that of the actual writer.) Here's the list I have so far:

Robert B. Parker
Dick Francis
Marion Zimmer Bradley
Isaac Asimov
Douglas Adams
V.C. Andrews
Frank Herbert
Mark Twain (his autobiography is due out in the next month or so!)
Walter M. Miller
Robert A. Heinlein
J.R.R. Tolkien

I keep joking that James Patterson and Clive Cussler belong on this list, since all their stuff seems to be coming out from other writers now. Maybe they're dead and the publisher is keeping it a secret? Anyway, let me know if you have others to suggest.

The second list is "Zombie Writers." These would be writers who have died and then been used as characters in works by other writers. I know there are a lot of these too, but I'm having more trouble remembering specific examples.

Jane Austen appears as a detective in Stephanie Barron's "Jane Austen mystery" series
Shakespeare appears as a character in James Joyce's Ulysses
I think Robert Heinlein appeared as a character in Spider Robinson's "Callahan's Saloon" stories
Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain) is a character in one of the Star Trek Next Generation stories

Any more good ones?
« Last Edit: October 02, 2010, 09:22:56 PM by Altivo » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2010, 11:13:04 PM »

robert frost, just recently a poem was found at the state college stuffed in a book, a habit of his.

Second, can't recall the author but in the story, a vampire one, main character had two mastiffs, Brom and Stoker.
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« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2010, 11:25:25 PM »

Does Sherlock Holmes count? Neil Gaiman did a brilliant rewrite of "A Study in Scarlet", set in a Lovecraftian England. The story's called "A Study in Emerald"; I found a link to it some months back, but it's a much easier read on paper.

Barring that, the novel "Arthur and George" by Julian Barnes has the great Conan Doyle himself as one of the main characters.
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« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2010, 11:31:41 PM »

Thanks.

A character being reused is not what I'm after (Laurie R. King has also used Holmes himself, and fairly well, in her Mary Russell detective stories.) However, I was sure that Doyle had appeared as a character so that's an excellent example. I couldn't remember where I'd seen him, and I'm not sure that's the place, but it will do. I'm pretty sure Dickens has also been used, perhaps more than once.

Dogs named Bram and Stoker are a funny idea, but would have to be "reincarnated author" rather than "zombie," no?
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« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2010, 09:41:11 PM »

Oh, here's another one. Samuel Taylor Coleridge made a cameo appearance in Douglas Adams' "Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency". And Ray Bradbury has Poe, Bierce, old Bill, Dickens, and a couple others in his short story, "The Exiles". That's all I can find right now, but I'm sure I have a couple more hidden away in my bookshelves.
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« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2010, 03:58:26 AM »

*Scratches ears*

Did I miss the obvious? Gene Roddenberry?
« Last Edit: October 05, 2010, 04:07:15 AM by Quinn Yellowfox » Logged

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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2010, 09:04:01 AM »

I'll add the following ghost and zombies:
  • Ghost: Joe Haldeman's The Hemingway Hoax which features Hemingway in a imaginative way.
  • Zombie: Philip K. Dick, new works as late as 94 when he died in 82.
  • Zombie: Clifford D. Shimak, new short story collections for 5 years.
  • Zombie: James Blish:  fiction (Star Trek sadly) 5 years, non fiction 12 years.
  • Zombie: John Wyndham, died in `69, last work published in `79.
  • Zombie: CM Kornbluth, technically only partly zombie as he was partnered with Fredrick Pohl as co-authors.

It seems to be the nature of authors of the fantastic, that they often produce far more than they publish simply as way to get the madness out. I wonder if in a few decades there will be  a few anthro authors who will fall in the same state. I just hope the examples aren't porn. Undecided
« Last Edit: October 04, 2010, 09:06:20 AM by Chromium Steel » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2010, 10:18:18 AM »

I can't really think of much in the way of this offhand, aside from half-jokingly suggesting that Jane Austen should be made an honorary ghost for Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and Sense and Sensibility and Seamonsters.

And, well... The original Carolyn Keene certainly was in no condition to write books anymore and the Nancy Drew files kept coming, FAIK. But that's an odd case since IIRC CK was a pseudonym in the first place.
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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2010, 03:28:39 PM »

I only remembered this one recently:

Victor Hugo, died in 1885, latest works published in 1951 and 2008.
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« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2010, 06:21:59 PM »

Got a ghost for you: Kurt Vonnegut has a new collection of previously unpublished shorts out on the market. I first saw them some months ago but completely forgot they existed until now.
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Altivo
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« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2010, 06:43:29 PM »

We have the display up now, but I'll see about just posting a longer list including all the ones we've come up with.

Most interesting in my opinion: Mark Twain, whose autobiography is coming out next month on his own instructions, 100 years after his death; and Carolyn Keene. Apparently there never was a real Carolyn Keene, but the pseudonym was created by Edward Stratemeyer (1865-1930) who began working with other authors. He was also responsible for the first Hardy Boys mysteries, under the name Franklin W. Dixon. You know, I did think it was interesting how similar Nancy Drew mysteries and Hardy Boys mysteries were, but it never dawned on me in all these years that some were written by the same author.
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« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2010, 08:34:25 PM »

More details. Children's writing in the early 20th century was much more "incestuous" than I realized. As it turns out, the Stratemeyer Syndicate originally created by Edward Stratemeyer still exists under the management of his descendants. The earliest of Stratemeyer's pseudonyms appears to have been Arthur Winfield, under which he wrote and published 30 volumes of The Rover Boys between 1899 and 1926. Even before 1910, Stratemeyer realized that he couldn't keep up with writing all the various series stories he was envisioning, and he started hiring ghost writers. One of the first choices was Howard Garis (who published the successful Uncle Wiggily stories under his own name as well. An early furry author!)

Wikipedia has lots more details here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stratemeyer_Syndicate

I was particularly intrigued by the claim that Stratemeyer's products accounted for an overwhelming majority of the books read by US children according to a study of 36,000 juvenile readers released in 1922.
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« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2010, 03:20:06 AM »

Need I point out the brother's grimm? If one reads the original stories, they are quite messed up. 
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« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2011, 08:37:59 PM »

Need I point out the brother's grimm? If one reads the original stories, they are quite messed up. 

Anything German of that era for that matter. Take the story of Little Suck-a-Thumb: http://www.wattpad.com/774414-a-german-fairy-tale
It's just one of a whole series of stories written to make children afraid of misbehaving by emotionally scarring them. I believe the book is called Struwwelpeter.
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« Reply #14 on: May 08, 2012, 08:58:23 AM »

Carolyn Keene.  for Nancy Drew
and
Franklin Dixon for Hardy Boys

I realize no one has posted on this in at least a few months, but I couldn't leave them off, having enjoyed the lists thus far
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