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Author Topic: Happy Thanksgiving!  (Read 2067 times)
Lutrina Lontra
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« on: November 25, 2010, 01:07:20 AM »

Happy Turkey Day, everybody! Gobble up those turkeys and get those turkey vore pictures/stories uploaded! XD

(I'm kidding about that last part...)
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Altivo
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« Reply #1 on: November 25, 2010, 02:20:26 AM »

 Grin

It would only be turkey vore if turkeys had brains. Speaking as one who has dealt with domestic poultry up close and personal, let me tell you: a zombie would starve in no time on an all turkey diet.

Yes, Happy Turkey Day to all the US folks and anyone outside the US who wants it. I have a turkey stuffed and in the oven right now so as not to have to do it tomorrow. I'll carve it up and make the gravy tonight. Cranberries already prepared, and so is the broccoli-cauliflower salad I usually make. I'll bake pumpkin pies in the morning early. Others are making potatoes, cooked barley, and appetizers.

The weather outside is frightful, a mixture of cold rain and sleet with the temperature hovering just above freezing. It may be nasty if it drops down and becomes ice.
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« Reply #2 on: November 25, 2010, 03:58:09 AM »

Happy Turkey Day, everybody! Gobble up those turkeys and get those turkey vore pictures/stories uploaded! XD

(I'm kidding about that last part...)
but I don't like cloacas! XD
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« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2010, 06:21:30 AM »

Send turkeys this way! I haven't had some since.... oooh man. The penultimate decade of the previous millenium. I didn't remember it being that long Roll Eyes
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« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2010, 09:48:22 AM »

I am so tempted to buy me a turkey if they still have them on the reasonably cheap at the one grocery.

Except I've no idea how to cook it and it'd take me forever and a day to eat the damn thing.
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Altivo
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« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2010, 11:37:39 AM »

Send turkeys this way! I haven't had some since.... oooh man. The penultimate decade of the previous millenium. I didn't remember it being that long Roll Eyes

Are they really that scarce there? I would think they'd be a natural. Like chickens, turkeys are a high efficiency protein producer that requires minimal space and effort. Probably not the giant white feathered varieties, but the older heirloom breeds would do well in your climate and are suited to high density populations. I suppose though that chickens are even more popular because they're smaller.
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Erkhyan
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« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2010, 12:34:58 PM »

It's not quite that they're rare, but they're prohibitively expensive. Something like two-thirds of the country's minimal monthly wages for a live one, and about three-quarters for a prepared one. For comparison, the price of a live turkey would easily cover my transportation expenses for a full month.

I think the only kind of poultry my family has eaten over the last several years is chicken, with the occasional duck or goose for the special events.
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Altivo
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« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2010, 12:54:24 PM »

How odd. I guess even after half a century I just don't understand economics. Waterfowl require more space and food to achieve the same edible weight.

Of course, as I've remarked in my DW journal this year, turkeys are less common here than they were even ten years ago. In the US, the issue appears to be that more and more people simply don't cook. They rely entirely on restaurants, take out food, and frozen "convenience" foods. Consequently, it is becoming more and more difficult to obtain real cooking ingredients of any quality. I'm talking here of basics like flour, meal, dry beans, soda, etc. Since preparing a turkey is regarded as some sort of wizardly magic much too difficult for lazy couch potatoes to perform, the general marketplace seems to be offering fewer of the birds even at the peak sale point of the year which would have been the last two weeks.

I suppose the economy enters into it to some degree, but this is hard for me to understand. A frozen, dressed turkey sells for less than $1 per pound in November. I bought one for 69 cents a pound and another for 99 cents a pound. So a 12 pound turkey is about $9. That creates quite a feast for a family or a week's worth of food for two or three.
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Erkhyan
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« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2010, 01:16:56 PM »

The thing is that here, turkeys have to be fed, while ducks and chicken can find their own food by roaming the roads and the rice paddies. Geese also need to be fed, but less than turkeys due to their greater independence.

Plus, turkeys have a slight tendency to get stolen if left wandering around. Chicken and ducks mostly don't.
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Altivo
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« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2010, 01:32:25 PM »

Uh huh. That's why I suggested the older heirloom turkey varieties. They feed themselves just as chickens do, and were typically left to wander. Here in Illinois we have the native wild turkey, ancestor to all the domesticated birds. It's quite a contrast. The wild birds are smart and tough, very good at taking care of themselves. They rove in small groups of five or six and I've occasionally had them cross the road in front of me or seen them standing at the edges of wooded areas.

As for people stealing turkeys, that's a natural consequence of the turkey being considered an expensive luxury rather than commonplace.
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« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2010, 01:46:23 PM »

Oh, and to QM:

Cooking a turkey is not at all difficult. You do need a large enough pan to roast it in, and an oven. Beyond that it's just common sense and little different from other fowl. Season, stuff if desired, slow roast at moderate temperature until tender. Basting with the juices and drippings is a good idea if the pan is uncovered, optional if it has a cover. It's clear to me that you know enough about cooking to handle it just fine.

The part I dislike is the carving once it's done roasting. It's such a messy job. How they used to do it at the table while dressed in fancy clothing I don't understand.
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