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Author Topic: Stuff You Won't Read  (Read 5276 times)
Lutrina Lontra
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« on: March 13, 2011, 05:34:42 AM »

Are there certain subjects or genres that you simply refuse to read, for whatever reason?

After reading a recent submission, I think I'll pass on horror stories for awhile. I get nightmares so easily. XP

While I don't mind reading erotic fiction, I can't stomach an explicit rape scene. Any time I've stumbled across them, even for reviewing purposes, I just can't stomach it. Even implied rape I get goosebumps over.
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« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2011, 05:59:32 AM »

Scat. As OCD as I am, the squick factor just makes me cringe. Slash pairings to a certain degree, they just seem kinda cheesy save for the horror type or the crack pairings for sheer amusement (Like giant squid from the lake and the Hogwarts castle.)
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« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2011, 06:06:41 AM »

When it comes to mainstream genres, I refuse to read dimestore romance novels (the kind that usually have Fabio on the cover) and anything too heavily rooted in politics (I hate politics). Other than that, I'll give anything a shot.

As far as sex stories go, I'm REALLY vanilla. Just regular ol' gay romance for me. No vore, cub, scat, pyronecropedophelia, inflation, or anything else outside of the basics.
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« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2011, 02:52:33 PM »

No vore, cub, scat, pyronecropedophelia, inflation, or anything else outside of the basics.

Hear, hear Aflor.
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« Reply #4 on: March 14, 2011, 06:55:28 AM »

Horror I think I can stomach. It's slashers I can't stand, movies and stories alike. Plus of course the aforementioned "weird" fetishes, of course.
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« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2011, 04:50:56 PM »

No vore, cub, scat, pyronecropedophelia, inflation, or anything else outside of the basics.

Hear, hear Aflor.

Ditto.

It's...kind of unsettling, to be honest.

What makes it --- I don't even --- just...no. (>__<)
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« Reply #6 on: March 14, 2011, 07:54:32 PM »

Horror I think I can stomach. It's slashers I can't stand, movies and stories alike. Plus of course the aforementioned "weird" fetishes, of course.

Yeah, I'm not a fan of slashers. The kind of horror I like -- and write-- is Lovecraftian. Basically the "There's no hope and anything that looks like hope is only designed to make your suffering worse in the end" kind. I actually have one of those stories posted on the site if anyone's interested.
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« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2011, 08:16:46 PM »

Ditto.

It's...kind of unsettling, to be honest.

What makes it --- I don't even --- just...no. (>__<)
Seconded. I think some things, we were never meant to know, Steven.

Yes, from now on, I'm calling you Steven. Deal with it, bud. :p
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« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2011, 01:49:26 AM »

Ditto.

It's...kind of unsettling, to be honest.

What makes it --- I don't even --- just...no. (>__<)
Seconded. I think some things, we were never meant to know, Steven.

Yes, from now on, I'm calling you Steven. Deal with it, bud. :p

Steven? My, what a dull name. No offense to all the other Stevens or Steves out there. I don't even think I look like one...
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« Reply #9 on: March 16, 2011, 11:07:28 PM »

I can't think of much of anything I absolutely won't read. I can think of things I probably won't like, but I'll read practically anything once. Yay for having the ability to turn off my squick reactions in favor of "hmm this sentence doesn't scan very well" editor reactions. XD

The closest I can think of for things I don't really want to read voluntarily is artsy stories. I absolutely hate form-over-function writing such as Toni Morrison's work.
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Lutrina Lontra
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« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2011, 01:29:05 AM »

I'm not sure I understand what you mean by 'artsy stories.' Aren't stories technically considered art anyway?
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« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2011, 10:32:55 AM »

I think she means those kinds of stories that captivate you with their mellifluous turns of phrase, but in the end, when the ducklings have gone to roost and the bluebirds' lilting chants wend their way through grasshopper legs and winnowed cornstalks into the idle ear of the idle listener, you'll find they say very little after all.

Incidentally, poetry has the same hypnotic effect on me - and is, technically speaking, very strictly form-over-function - but the structure of it can actually lend to the message, and, despite the attention to form, it's still very easy to tell if a poem's vacuously beautiful or not.
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« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2011, 10:59:27 AM »

Oh, no, Reiter. Artsy stories aren't captivating at all. Artsy stories are the ones that practically scream "look at me aren't I clever for doing this completely obnoxious thing that jars you out of actually reading the story". Toni Morrison's Jazz is a "great" example of this; the story is probably good (what I could make out was quite decent at any rate), but the form makes it practically unreadable, because she's not interested in telling the story. She's interested in being artsy and playing with form.

In the poetry world, you've got... I think it's EE Cummings's Grasshopper? That's form-over-function to a similar degree; the damn thing can't really be read out loud to any effect. Compare the rat's tail poem in Alice in Wonderland; while it's presented with a lot of attention to form, the form hasn't overridden function to the point where reading it is an intellectual exercise more than a pleasure.

There's a difference between art and being artsy. Artsy stories are the writing equivalent of emptying a trash bag on the floor of an upscale gallery and calling it art.
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« Reply #13 on: March 17, 2011, 11:24:52 AM »

There are some, at least, that succeed - to a degree. I can't recall who it was who compared prettifying a story to putting makeup on a beautiful girl, or painting roses red, but I thought that was an apt metaphor. Yes, if they overdo it, then they scream at you to pay them attention, but there's a point where it's gaudy but can still have you fooled. Maybe "captivating" wasn't the right word; perhaps "hypnotic" would be better. I gave an example somewhere here of Twain's parody of form-over-function writing, and the words did flow along very smoothly despite having nothing remotely sensible to say.

I'm going to both agree and disagree with you about Cummings. I agree that much of his poetry is utterly incomprehensible, reads like an IQ test for those >250, and borders on the absurd. But then, I don't think he really intended them to be read in the traditional sense, anyway. Cummings was an abstract artist (Cubist, if I remember correctly), and in his poetry he tried to marry the two fields. It's form to an extremely extremist degree*, but I don't doubt that he intended it to have function as well, if only people were "smart" enough to perceive his meaning. I'm thinking of it as being like a Zen koan - are there even any points to them? And yet they (supposedly) bring enlightenment closer to their practitioners.

*Though you could say it's form of the wrong sort. Literature is more closely tied to music than to visual art. The natural rhythm is what got the Greeks started on poetry/prosody and it's what made Shakespeare give "arrhythmic" prose lines to his madmen. Maybe you're balking more at Cummings than Carroll because, even though both of them had meaning to convey, Cummings did it by fitting the proverbial square in the proverbial round hole. And you'd have to be ingenious to do that sort of thing, but still, it may not look very pretty.

I'm not familiar with Morrison, but I doubt she was trying to portray Picasso through her writing. Could you try - as objectively as possible - to describe what her style is and why it makes you cringe so?
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Lutrina Lontra
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« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2011, 06:17:22 PM »

Alright, alright, if folks want to argue about 'artsy stories' then make another thread about it, thank you. X3

I might add to my little list that what I prefer to read is greatly dependent on my mood. Also, since everybody keeps listing kinks and such they avoid, I'll say that I avoid most of them as well. But I rarely if ever read porn, so it doesn't really matter. xD
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