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Author Topic: Show AND Tell: The Importance of a Happy Median  (Read 10167 times)
Korygon
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« Reply #60 on: May 25, 2011, 04:46:19 PM »

Anywhoo, America is the bastard son of the world, and hence, we speak a bastard verision of the world's tongues.

On a similar note, the Twilight saga was extremely well written and should win a Pulitzer Prize.


Seriously though, I disagree with this statement...well at least part of it.  While America does speak a bastardized version of the English language, it's because of the huge multi-cultural influence.  This is why you can can be in New England and speaking what you think is perfectly proper English, then you can go to Arizona and people are barely going to understand what you are talking about.  It also doesn't help that the population of people who can't speak or understand more than 10 words of English is growing more and more each day.
One day, every town in the US is going to have its own language.  Not looking forward to that.
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Altivo
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« Reply #61 on: May 25, 2011, 06:14:25 PM »

One day, every town in the US is going to have its own language.  Not looking forward to that.

Oh, I think that's unlikely. The geographic differences in US speech patterns have been fading now for almost a century. The influence of radio, movies, and television have a lot to do with that. With kids spending much of their childhood watching television, many of them fail to acquire the strong regional accents that were once so common.

A highly mobile population that relocates constantly is also a major "mixmaster" when it comes to dialect.

Unless major changes in those patterns come along, I suspect within another hundred years the regionalisms will be nearly extinct.
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« Reply #62 on: May 25, 2011, 10:15:10 PM »

I'm just waiting 'till Ebonics becomes declared the national language... good thing I still have my Norwegian passport.
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« Reply #63 on: May 25, 2011, 10:17:42 PM »

One day, every town in the US is going to have its own language.  Not looking forward to that.

Oh, I think that's unlikely. The geographic differences in US speech patterns have been fading now for almost a century. The influence of radio, movies, and television have a lot to do with that. With kids spending much of their childhood watching television, many of them fail to acquire the strong regional accents that were once so common.

A highly mobile population that relocates constantly is also a major "mixmaster" when it comes to dialect.

Unless major changes in those patterns come along, I suspect within another hundred years the regionalisms will be nearly extinct.

True, though it still doesn't help that a good 10% of my customers can't speak a word of English.  I guess, though, that it's all the parents that can't speak it, so their children (poorly) translate for them.
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« Reply #64 on: May 25, 2011, 10:24:40 PM »

Oh yes, we see that in the library here frequently. The parents speak no English, and the little kids, often under 6 years old, translate for them.
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« Reply #65 on: May 25, 2011, 10:27:57 PM »

That's probably the case. Children pick up languages waaay faster than adults can, which is why one often sees second-generation immigrants with both new and old (=parents') languages as native tongues. In cases where the region has no one primary language, they can even construct a new one (as they did with Hawaiian Creole at the turn of the 19th-20th century).
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« Reply #66 on: May 25, 2011, 11:16:59 PM »

Anyone tried to read Annie Proulx?
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« Reply #67 on: May 25, 2011, 11:27:29 PM »

Sure. I rather enjoyed what I read of Proulx, including the now infamous "Brokeback Mountain" (which I think Hollywood wrecked horrendously.)
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« Reply #68 on: May 27, 2011, 04:15:34 AM »

@ Reiter. Hawaiian Creole? I'd love to see a menu! Etouffee with pineapple sounds really good.
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« Reply #69 on: August 04, 2011, 04:05:27 PM »

Dead topic? Maybe, I dunno.

I read through the thread and I have to agree with original sentiments. I think it depends on the narrative style of the writing; for instance (like the thing I'm working on) if you have a character recalling past events, it makes sense to tell and show in a good balance, at least in reference to that character's experience. The character is talking about his past, after all. Of course, it's a little difficult in application sometimes to figure out what works where.

I'm just waiting 'till Ebonics becomes declared the national language... </snip>

Dear God I hope not.
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